Is A Cure Ever Going To Be Viable For iZombie?

iZombie has been one of my surprise favourite shows since it first premièred three years ago, consistently well-written, funny and incredibly charming. Featuring a murder-solving zombie (seriously, just watch it), the idea of a cure for Liv Moore and the other zombies of Seattle has always been the series’ most prominent driving force and always promised to be a game changing discovery.…
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Don’t Breathe Is One of the Most Effective Horrors In Ages

Don’t Breathe manages to take a simple premise, a small cast and an equally small location and create a well crafted and original horror not reliant on jump scares (although there are still plenty of those). Director Fede Alvarez finds creative ways to use sound, light and space to create a terrifyingly claustrophobic twist on the home invasion thriller.…
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Green Room or My Last Experience of Anton Yelchin

Last week, we lost a great talent in the form of Anton Yelchin. A few weeks before that, I had the pleasure of watching him in Green Room. Admittedly “pleasure” might be an odd choice of word, considering the nail-biting, gut-churning content but that’s beside the point. As my most recent experience of Yelchin on-screen, my thoughts in the wake of the news kept wondering back to the film.…
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Evil Dead II (1987) – Film-a-Day 114

Who is the best slapstick comedy actor in film history? Charlie Chaplin? Buster Keaton? Jim Carrey? Jackie Chan? If you thought it was any of the above then you’re wrong. Whilst all of them are great at what they do and succeed in making the audience laugh using just their body language they all have two things holding them back.…
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Blow Out (1981)

Though Brian De Palma is probably best known for Scarface, The Untouchables and Mission: Impossible, his genres of choice are horror/thrillers. Sisters, Phantom of the Paradise, Carrie, Dressed to Kill and finally Blow Out, all show his bloody nihilistic talents. In another life, De Palma could have been an all time great director, but unfairly he comes off as an Alfred Hitchcock copyist, obsessed with voyeurism, murder and beautiful women.…
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The Night of the Hunter (1955) – 2016 Film-A-Day 5

The Night of the Hunter (1955) is a basic good vs. evil parable, shown in a way that is tense, fascinating and terrifying and unique. Often categorised as a film-noir, this film although adopting many elements from that genre; is far from a genre stereotype. It incorporates the best parts of many other genres including thriller, drama, romance and horror into a eerie film with religion at its heart.…
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Audition (1999)

Audition is a masterpiece of Japanese cinema and if you have not yet watched it, do so now and before continuing, there will be spoilers that may ruin your experience of the film. With its narrative of featuring a scorned, potentially mentally-unstable woman ruining a man’s life and pet-death, Audition could be seen as taking Fatal Attraction‘s bunny-boiler character trope to its nth degree.…
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An American Werewolf in London (1981)

For some reason I thought John Landis directed Groundhog Day. Apparently not. Apparently it was not Ivan Reitman either. Harold Ramis directed Groundhog Day and John Landis directed An American Werewolf in London. John Landis and Harold Ramis are vastly different directors despite creating some of the best loved comedy films of the 80s.…
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Suspiria (1977)

One of the keys to effective horror is the illusion of normalcy, creating a scenario where scares seem the furthest of all possibility. An over-used (but occasionally great) example would be a group (maybe family, or colleagues) talking and joking over a meal – the perfect picture of calm domesticity – horrors as varied as Alien and Martyrs have quite unexpectedly and expertly inverted this peaceful setting into sheer terror.…
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Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

As a director Guillermo Del Toro seeks to create intricate yet disparate worlds. For all the dark wonder of Pan’s Labyrinth, it is nothing like the forever-midnight streets of Blade or the Kaiju-ravaged world of Pacific Rim. Despite this, all these settings feel almost real-life and lived-in and this is mainly because of Del Toro’s commitment to his projects, producing notebooks upon notebooks of world notes and sketches so that the vision is wholly his own.…
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